Category Archives: Exploration

“ALL THESE WORLDS ARE YOURS . . . “


We live in incredible times.

Today I checked out the NASA website as I always do and saw a news feature that immediately caught my eye. Under the heading ‘NASA Space Assets Detect Ocean inside Saturn Moon’ the article went on to describe some data which has been returned from the Cassini mission robotic explorer which indicated that it may have detected an ocean underneath the ice that covers one of Saturn’s moons – Enceladus. Continue reading “ALL THESE WORLDS ARE YOURS . . . “

Remembering the Crew of Apollo 1


if we die, we want people to accept it. We are in a risky business, and we hope that if anything happens to us, it will not delay the program. The conquest of space is worth the risk of life.

—Astronaut Gus Grissom, 1965

Official NASA portrait of Virgil I. Grissom. Image Courtesy of NASA.
Official NASA portrait of Virgil I. Grissom. Image Courtesy of NASA.

I knew it must be serious . . . . . . I think I was down my grand-parents house and the old black and white television was on, sitting on its special table in the corner. We weren’t taking much notice of it, or at least I wasn’t. But then all the chattering stopped and I looked up from whatever it was that I was doing and noticed everyone was quiet and looking at the TV set.

On screen was one of the TV news presenters and under his image on the screen was the word ‘News Flash’ or something like that. The next thing that happened was that the TV was going ‘live’ to one of its reporters at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, where reports were coming in indicating that a serious accident had occurred. Continue reading Remembering the Crew of Apollo 1

. . . . thoughts on manned exploration of space . . . .


‘if we die, we want people to accept it. We are in a risky business, and we hope that if anything happens to us, it will not delay the program. The conquest of space is worth the risk of life.’

— Astronaut Gus Grissom, 1965

From Mercury to the Moon – Alan Shepard – Part 2


View in Lunar orbit from Lunar Orbit from Lunar Module 'Antares'.
View in Lunar orbit from Lunar Orbit from Lunar Module ‘Antares’. In the distance you can just make out the Earth rising. Image courtesy of NASA.

Part One of this article can be found by clicking here.

Apollo 14 had also had its share of ‘glitches’ on its transit from Earth to The Moon.

A major milestone of the mission was to accelerate the Apollo 14 spacecraft from the 17,500mph orbital velocity to 24,500mph. To achieve this velocity would mean re-igniting the still attached S-IVB third stage engine for 6 minutes. Once the ‘TLI burn’ had successfully occurred, the Apollo Command and Service Module’s would have to detach themselves from the now redundant S-IVB. However at the top end of the now expended third stage was the Lunar Module ‘Antares’, safely encased in the Lunar Module Adapter section. The Command Module Pilot – Stuart Roosa – would now perform a third vital maneuver of the mission; the ‘Transposition and Docking’ maneuver. This required separating the Command and Service Modules from third stage and then revolving the spacecraft so that the front of it was facing the now following S-IVB stage. A command would then be issued to open Lunar Module Adapter panels that encased the Lunar Module. With the panels successfully opened, the Command Module Pilot would apply forward thrust to Command Module and using a docking probe attached to the front of the Command Module, insert this into what was referred to as the drogue at the top of the Lunar Module.

Continue reading From Mercury to the Moon – Alan Shepard – Part 2

From Mercury to The Moon – Alan Shephard


It had been a long journey for Alan Shepard, both in time and the sacrifices he had to make in his life to be at the place he was now. The defining moment of all of these things; long hours of training, the frustration of looking from the outside in, had now taken him to this pivotal moment in time and space – literally.

Continue reading From Mercury to The Moon – Alan Shephard

For All Mankind: Vintage NASA Photographs 1964 – 1983


There are five things that I own that I covet above all else – other than my wife and family of course.

These possessions are as follows and the order that I commit them to this post, does not in any way place one above the other in my affections.

Continue reading For All Mankind: Vintage NASA Photographs 1964 – 1983

. . . . I fully intended . . .


my brain hurts
Women – can’t live without them – but trying to figure out what their thinking . . .

‘ . . . . they said try to do some Creative Writing . . . . it will help you to express your feelings . . .

So I did.

Avoid any subjects that make you feel sad; stir up negative thoughts; you need to start concentrating on subjects that lift your spirits and perhaps creating a blog could be a way of sharing your thoughts with a wider audience.

Continue reading . . . . I fully intended . . .

. . . . If you are interested . . . .


Following on from my earlier post and alluding to the “Christmas Lecture” that Carl Sagan delivered in 1977, I am posting a link to the last lecture of the series.

It is at the end of this lecture, that Carl Sagan produces the dandelion and then proceeds to blow the seeds into the auditorium, as a metaphor for humanity sending his robotic emissaries to explore the Solar System and beyond.

 

Continue reading . . . . If you are interested . . . .